Tagged: stage

WHORE – ‘the encore’ trailer

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Review: ‘Whore’ by Elise Hoggard

Guest Blogger: Elise Hoggard

Devised and directed by Melissa herself, the Charlatan Clinic’s latest project “Whore” is a refreshing collection of six monologues, based on street sex workers in New Zealand. Tucked away at the end of Auckland’s notorious K-Road is Lifewise Merge café, which up until November 2010, was a soup kitchen. This is where the “Whore” journey begins. Offered a “do I look like a whore?” badge and paper cup of minestrone soup, I felt at home instantly- warmth, stability and respect radiating from the Lifewise staff; a true testament to their dedication to the “Whore” cause.

Seated on wooden pews, the audience is intimate, yet tis this intimacy that makes the “Whore” experience that much more impacting. Harrowing music plays as we take our seat- two half naked live performers roaming through the audience, offering their bodies in exchange for cash, creating an awkward yet apt foreshadowing of what is to follow.

Over the next hour we meet our six characters; rent boy, illegal migrant, refugee, married woman, underage street worker and transgender. Played by three actors with a simple change of furniture, the small space the cast inhabits is transformed accordingly. Over the course of the production there is a roller coaster of emotion, the actor’s honesty apparent through every sigh, twitch of the jaw and rattle in their voice. It was these subtleties that made the play what is was. “Whore” was believable as hell; I wasn’t sitting in a café watching theatre, I was sitting in on a support group at Lifewise. There was sorrow, there were nerves- even laughter, but more than anything, there was understanding.

“The only difference between you and I- is I have sex and get paid cold cash”; a powerful piece of prose from the ‘Married Worker’. Who are we to judge street workers on their vocation when we are marginalized everyday, just in different ways? This production is not here to expose unknown truths of prostitution. It is here to normalize and de-stigmatize what you might believe about sex work. This production is to challenge one to think more actively about what we see everyday on K-Road and how we as a society can create more opportunities for those struggling. It’s here to raise awareness on an issue, which is damaging and dangerous. It’s a cry for help and a scream for change.

Do you still think sex work is a choice?

Lee’s Thoughts On Playing A Woman For #whoreplay

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I was very excited (at last) to meet a (real-life) ‘Transgender’ woman to probe about what it feels like to transition from man-to-woman. So many questions arrived in my head – too many to verbalise. The main thing that intrigued me – was when did it happen? When was the first ‘instance’ you felt that you were born in the wrong body? The answer was 4 years old. Wow. I asked about hormones. As I already knew from Melissa and research, hormones definitely impact heavily on your sex drive, cause depression, you can also become impotent at times and feel generally unwell. What happens when I wear a short skirt? “Use duck tape. Be brave. Suck it up girl.” Magic words, that I will embrace.

‘Whore’ Speaks Out

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MEDIA RELEASE
27 March 2014
Media release: charlatan clinic

Challenging Theatre: ‘Whore’ Speaks Out

Charlatan clinic and Printable Reality are proudly working
In collaboration to present our new work ‘Whore’.

Contemporary, topical, true-life based monologues told by six
Characters: ‘Married Woman’, ‘Underage Sex Worker’, ‘Illegal
Migrant’, ‘Rent Boy’, ‘Refugee’ and ‘Transgender’. This work is a
Collection of stories about street sex workers in Auckland, New Zealand.

Directed and written by Melissa Fergusson (‘Motherlock’, ‘The
Artefact Project’, ‘pURe’, ‘Salt), the show features acting talent
Rebecca Parr (‘Shortland Street’, ’pURe’), Lee Ah Yen
Faatoia (‘The 3UP’, ‘Hongi’ for Sexy Bird) and Geraldine Creff
(Tartuffe, Spartacus) in the principal character roles.

‘Whore’ is performing at ‘Lifewise’ Merge Café on May 29 – June 1 at 8pm, who are kindly
Supporting and sponsoring this event. ‘Lifewise’ is an Auckland-based community organisation
Initiating new ways to solve challenging social issues and providing services to families in need, the
Homeless as well as older and disabled people.

Project Whore: interview #10

1. What are your thoughts on prostitution?
More negative than positive.

It’s not as bad as war, genocide, starvation, violence … but not as good as Christmas is for the middle class kids, good friends, being loved, or achieving a long-held ambition.

It’s the kind of thing I wouldn’t want to be part of my life or want to be part of my daughter or sons future, but is something I can easily understand how people end up involved in as providers or users.

2. Have you slept with a sex worker before?
No.

3. Why or why not?
Firstly because my catholic upbringing taught me sex was a sacred act to be reserved for marriage. That was a rigid guide-frame for my life until just a few years ago.

Secondly because I feel it degrades the dignity of both user and the sex worker.

Thirdly, probably as a result of the first two points, I don’t think I’d enjoy it.

Fourthly, there are many other things I’d rather spend money on.

4. What does the word ‘whore’ mean to you?
A pejorative reference to a woman who trades sex.

5. Do you believe in monogamy?
Yes. More important to me than diverse sexual experience is a deep, rich and committed relationship which I believe monogamy helps.

6. Have you been solicited to, by a sex worker in the street? Male or female?
No, not that I recall.

7. Do you think sex work is a choice?
Yes and no. Everything is a choice, so yes in that sense. Slavery and addiction limit the choices of some people to living any way they can (e.g. sex work) or dying. I’m not well enough informed to know what circumstanced generally lead people to sex work.

8. Are you heterosexual, bisexual or gay?
Hetro

9. Are you tempted to pay for sex, if you want to experiment?
No, see 3.3 above.

10. Lastly, do you judge others who visit sex workers regularly?

I try to stay out of the habit of judging people. It might be something that informs their social behaviour more generally, and if there is deceit of a committed partner involved I’d consider that wrong. But then there are lots of things wrong in this world…

Project Whore: interview #9

1. What are your thoughts on prostitution?
Don’t like it. It’s weird, I believe there should be some form of connection between two sexual partners and that connection shouldn’t be money.

2. Have you slept with a sex worker before?
No

3. Why or why not?
There’s no connection between 2 people if one is paying the other for sex. One person is doing it to satisfy themselves sexually, the other is doing it to make money. It’s bizarre.

4. What does the word ‘whore’ mean to you?
It’s a derogatory term for a sex worker, it’s very negative.

5. Do you belief in monogamy?
Yes

6. Have you been solicited to, by a sex worker in the street? Male or female?
Yeah, a couple times, not in New Zealand though.

7. Do you think sex work is a choice?
Yes

8. Are you heterosexual, bisexual or gay?
Heterosexual

9. Are you tempted to pay for sex, if you want to experiment?
No

10. Lastly, do you judge others who visit sex workers regularly?
I don’t know anyone who does so I haven’t needed to judge. I’d like to say; each to their own and not judge them, but I know that I would.

Project Whore: interview #7

 

1.What are your thoughts on prostitution?

 I don’t think prostitution is a choice for many. Some want to get rich (quick) and the others are forced into it. I am not here to judge people on how they live their life.

2. Have you slept with a sex worker before?
 No.

3. Why or why not?
I have never needed to pay for sex.

4. What does the word ‘whore’ mean to you?

 I don’t call a prostitute a whore. I think it too offensive to call someone a whore – when all they are doing is their job.

5. Do you belief in monogamy?
 Yes and no.

6. Have you been solicited to, by a sex worker in the street? Male or female?
Yes.

7. Do you think sex work is a choice?

Yes and no.  To some people sex work is all about money and freedom. In the third world countries, woman only do it to feed their family.

8. Are you heterosexual, bisexual or gay?
Heterosexual.

9. Are you tempted to pay for sex, if you want to experiment?
 Yes.

10. Lastly, do you judge others who visit sex workers regularly?

No, why would you?