Tagged: project whore

Interview with #whoreplay Filmmaker: Tim Butler-Jones

1. When did you discover photography and/or filmmaking?

Photography and the arts have been something I’ve grown up with. My paternal side of the family have been making a living in the creative industries one way or the other for generations. My great grandfather was Herbert Tornquist, who owned a successful portrait studio on Queen Street from the 1930’s and my uncle is Mark Brazier-Jones, internationally celebrated artist, master furniture and lighting designer.

On a personal level, I discovered film making at Music college when one of our assignments was to make a music video. the project earned me my best mark over the whole course. From there I eventually moved to NZ and went to Film School and from there got into photography.

2.Where do you get your inspiration?

I take my inspiration from wherever I can get it! It may be from a line of music, a throwaway comment someone made, a dream… anything that sends a train of thought running. More immediate forms of inspiration come from nature, the female form, architecture, engineering and music.

3.What is your most memorable still/footage you have ever taken?

A friend had organised for a male and female model to come in for a photoshoot in his home studio. We were both just starting out in photography and I’d been invited along as a laugh and for a bit of experience. The lighting was poor and all I had was my father’s old manual focus Nikon 50mm f.2. I wasn’t getting many great shots, but then I turned the colour profile in the camera onto black and white and all of a sudden I was getting amazing images that looked like a Calvin Klein advert. Looking back at it now, it’s pretty cringeworthy but it was at that point that I made a concerted effort to get as good as I can at the medium and improve the eye for composition and light.

4.How did you come up with the name ‘Four Eyes Media’?

There were originally three of us in the company and we couldn’t come up with a name that we all agreed on. Sitting together one night, my partner, Emma, pointed out that the only thing we all had in common was that the three of us wore glasses. By the time they left the company the name was already registered with the company register and so now I’m stuck with a name better suited to an optometrists.

5.Have you worked on other projects with charlatan clinic before?

I worked on Artefact Project and Motherlock/pURe double-bill.

6.Who would you really like to film/photograph – name anyone?

I’d like to find an ultimate muse that I can photograph over and over again and continually draw inspiration from. However, as that’s a fairly evasive answer to a well intentioned hypothetical question I would like to photograph Bjork.

7.What is the most important lesson you have learned taking pictures of people?

Getting to know your subject and putting them at ease can be the hardest aspects of a photoshoot. It is as much a skill as any technical aspect. Also maintaining professionalism throughout a shoot. Also, don’t make jokes as they can backfire, and never show a client unfinished work.

8.Do you prefer digital or Polaroid?

Digital.

9.What is your dream location to film/shoot?

The Favella’s of Rio.

10.What makes you smile?

Accomplishment. Family and friends. Cats. Food. Booze.

20140612-195326-71606372.jpg

Advertisements

Project Whore: interview #11

1. What are your thoughts on prostitution?

I think that prostitution is a far more complex issue than either the media, the public or politicians treat it. It is a polarizing issue that people from the left and right wing kick around like a political football, while very few people actually have a clue what they are talking about. While I laude the liberal attitudes of New Zealand to regulate prostitution in brothels, I feel ashamed that we still don’t have safety nets put in place for the most vulnerable in our society in the twenty first century. Once a teenager gets a few convictions, and a drug habit society washes their hands of them and that is a tragedy I and others like me push to the back of our consciousness.

2. Have you slept with a sex worker before?

Yes

3. Why or why not?

I was young and both socially and sexually inadequate.

4. What does the word ‘whore’ mean to you?

An insult.

5. Do you belief in monogamy?

Yes.

6. Have you been solicited to, by a sex worker in the street? Male or female?

No.

7. Do you think sex work is a choice?

I think there are as many reasons for becoming a sex worker as there are sex workers working. In my opinion, there is no simple answer to this: Romanian teenagers kidnaped and forced to inject heroin clearly have no choice, while middle class girls who do the occasional escort services for extra money or to pay for college do. However, these are two extreme (and hopefully rare) ends of the spectrum. For the vast majority I cannot possibly comment, though I suspect that the further down the social ladder you go, the less choice is involved.

8. Are you heterosexual, bisexual or gay?

Heterosexual.

9. Are you tempted to pay for sex, if you want to experiment?

No.

10. Lastly, do you judge others who visit sex workers regularly?

​Probably, though I think that as a society we need some serious debate over our attitudes to sex and the way we teach it to our young adults. At best, we’re a little screamish about it; at worst, mediaeval and hysterical about it. That is the only way you are going to reduce the numbers of people seeking out prostitutes to fulfil their baser sexual proclivities.

Project whore: interview with ‘Mary Haddock-Staniland’

“Mary Haddock-Staniland is an energetic, larger than life, passionate, and out-there character, she has a determination to succeed and believes in squeezing every last drop out of life.

Mary is a superb MC, presenter, raconteur, blogger, voice over artist and occasional guest on TV and radio, along with being a savvy business woman. Mary has the ability to balance all of this all in a day! Over the last twelve years Mary has been something of a fixture on the Auckland social circuit. She has variously hosted beauty pageants, charity auctions, and even taken part in NZ Fashion Week events.”

1. What are your thoughts on prostitution?
Personally I don’t get it. Everyone in life has a choice. You decide what path you want to take in your life. You get out of life what you put in, and I think prostitution is the “easy way” out. The emotional and mental harm it must do to you is a concern to me, I wish I could go by sweep everyone up off the street and bring them back to me, and look after everyone, give them homes and jobs and show them that there is light at the end of the tunnel.

2. Have you slept with a sex worker before?
No, never.

3. Why or why not?
It isn’t something I’ve ever needed to do.

4. What does the word ‘whore’ mean to you?
Whore to me means someone who isn’t ok with who they are. Someone who goes out to get attention from the same or opposite sex.

5. Do you believe in monogamy?
I do, but I also think that people aren’t designed or built to be with the same person forever. These days relationships are more flexible, and I would personally see no issue with the changing face of mine, as long as both agreed.

6. Have you been solicited to, by a sex worker in the street? Male or female?
No I never have.

7. Do you think sex work is a choice?
Yes, I do. I understand both sides, for and against. But I think people should be allowed to be given a second chance, whatever that may be.

8. Are you heterosexual, bisexual or gay?
I am a Transgendered individual.

9. Are you tempted to pay for sex, if you want to experiment?
No, I’ve never been tempted to pay for sex.

10. Lastly, do you judge others who visit sex workers regularly?
I’ve spent my entire life being judged, I wouldn’t judge someone for visiting sex workers. It is their choice, you’re entitled to that.