Category: Uncategorized

Review: First Scene (Fancy Dress)

melissafergusson

Are you having a fancy dress party? This is the place to venture to – if so. Word. Whether it’s an Elizabethan gig and you’re looking for ruffs, pantaloons, jerkins, corsets, queens & kings wigs – they have this covered. Or maybe you’re after Bollywood attire? I have indeed hired ruffs, tutus, props, wigs and costuming from First Scene. It’s rather overwhelming place to visit – so make sure you ask someone for assistance – if you’re short on time. I particularly like the selection of false eyelashes, theatre makeup and their shoe selection. All the staff are suitably friendly and helpful. Based just over the hill from Kingsland’s Main Street (shops and cafes) so very convenient and centrally located with parking right outside the building. Cool. Majestic. Transformative. Check it out.

First Scene

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Interview With Amy Brosnahan

melissafergusson

1) Tell me about for your first modelling job?
My first modelling job was for ‘Battle of the Babes’ which was such an amazing experience. Can’t wait to see what the future brings.

2) What age did you consider yourself female and/or transgender?
I was born a boy – but I was born in the wrong body. I have always been a girl; I just didn’t know how to express it.

3) Who/what is your inspiration?
I have two types of inspirations. My first inspiration would be family and friends. They are always the best kind of inspiration! My second inspiration would be my all time favorite famous idols. I live a happy and full life with no regrets.

4) What is your go-to cosmetic product and why?
MAC make up for sure, it’s just the best for coverage and when you’re in front of a camera – it’s a…

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Interview with L.Y.C (Love Your Condom): Ricky Te Akau

melissafergusson

1. When/why was LYC initiated?

L.Y.C is a community-focused programme designed to create a condom culture across Aotearoa New Zealand. L.Y.C encourages all gay and bisexual men to use condoms and lube every time they have sex. It is a sexy, upbeat call to ‘love your condom’. ‘Love your condom’ is about moving us past all those lame excuses not to be safe, and inspires us to not just tolerate, but love the sexy confidence that comes with condom covered cocks.

L.Y.C recognises that gay and bisexual men, the people most at risk of HIV, are influenced by their partners, whānau, friends, colleagues, employers and the environment in which they live. While it is essential that L.Y.C reaches and affects all gay and bisexual men living in Aotearoa New Zealand, it is also necessary to reach the people who can support, influence and enable gay and bisexual men to use…

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Interview With NZPC Founder, Sex Work Activist & Former Sex Worker: Catherine Healey

melissafergusson

1. When/Why did you establish NZPC?

We established NZPC in 1987 to support each other and to address the illegality of our work in the face of police arrests and the potential of HIV to affect our work. We were determined to make conditions related to our work safer and had to to build awareness that legislative change was needed for this to happen.

2. Do you directly work with sex workers’ Catherine?

Most of my work involves direct work with sex workers on a daily basis.

3. What is your stance on underage sex work?

NZ shifted its focus to one of protecting sex workers who are under the age of 18, as opposed to one of prosecuting these young people. This used to be the case before the law changed in 2003.

4. Do you know the current statistics of sex workers in NZ?

I’m aware there are…

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Sleeping Rough In Auckland City

melissafergusson

All week I have been anticipating ‘sleeping rough’ for Lifewise #bigsleepout in Central Auckland. Loaded up with my essentials: (loaned) sleeping bag, beanie, merino gloves, IPhone (to tweet), house keys, ATM card, lipstick and WHORE flyers for potential audience. After registering for the event, we all received personalised cardboard mats and a goodie bag: beanie, Idealog, Special K bar and Merge Cafe voucher. The Whore team scouted an ideal location to settle down, then dinner was on the agenda. Over 100 people lined up for meatballs and spaghetti with a slice of buttered bread: hearty meal. Icecream quickly followed, sponsored by Nice Blocks. We heard great speeches by Lifewise, poetry and an interview with Chanelle who told her story about homelessness, sex work, foster care, mental health admissions and her new job. I was invited into the makeshift cardboard house, shared conversation with many new friends/rough sleepers and was photographed/filmed…

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Play Reading: Whore

melissafergusson

Let the storytelling begin!

‘Whore’ is a collection of monologues based on true events; about sex workers who live in Auckland, New Zealand. After extensive research, meetings and interviews; the work can (now) start.

The stories have unique titles called: Illegal Migrant, ‘Married Woman’, ‘Transgender’, ‘Underage Sex Worker’, ‘Rent Boy’ and ‘Refugee’. Performing in late May, in an alternative space: ‘charlatan clinic style’.

The cast involved: Rebecca Parr, Lee Ah Yen and Geraldine Creff.

This project is in collaboration with up to 20 ‘creative’ people, and I am excited to be leading this process.

Join us on Facebook for all the updates –

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Whore/805486722811024?ref=hl

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Project Whore: interview #7

 

1.What are your thoughts on prostitution?

 I don’t think prostitution is a choice for many. Some want to get rich (quick) and the others are forced into it. I am not here to judge people on how they live their life.

2. Have you slept with a sex worker before?
 No.

3. Why or why not?
I have never needed to pay for sex.

4. What does the word ‘whore’ mean to you?

 I don’t call a prostitute a whore. I think it too offensive to call someone a whore – when all they are doing is their job.

5. Do you belief in monogamy?
 Yes and no.

6. Have you been solicited to, by a sex worker in the street? Male or female?
Yes.

7. Do you think sex work is a choice?

Yes and no.  To some people sex work is all about money and freedom. In the third world countries, woman only do it to feed their family.

8. Are you heterosexual, bisexual or gay?
Heterosexual.

9. Are you tempted to pay for sex, if you want to experiment?
 Yes.

10. Lastly, do you judge others who visit sex workers regularly?

No, why would you?